Sampras Forehand, Robert Lansdorp and Tennis Training

Pete Sampras had a great forehand.  Many he said he had one of the best on-the-run forehands of all time.   Sampras hit the forehand very flat and he DROVE through the ball often to devastating effect.      His clean hit and clean swing on the forehand side also allowed him to develop a clean attacking approach shot.

Sampras uses what is known as the “Lansdorp Forehand”   it uses a classic grip and does NOT use heavy topspin or a western-grip.    Robert Lansdorp is a famous coach who is a living legend.   He trained Sampras and Davenport and Tracy Austin and Maria Sharapova.

If you want to read some interesting opinion on training I would check out the blog that Robert has (or maybe used to have):


Lansdorp he stresses “Discipline”      and he is big on the players being focused.   He also wants the players to spend a lot of time on repetition.   Some might say “ball after ball after ball”          He has a “tough guy” approach and he demands discipline of the player.   I think Lansdorp is a great coach and his track record really speaks for itself.    I am sure he has rubbed many people the wrong way throughout his life BUT I can say for sure, that now, in a time where American tennis is looking weak … and people are asking “where are all of the champions?”     People need to be looking at Robert Lansdorp and his teaching approach.


P.S. If you google Lansdorp or the “Lansdorp Forehand” you can easily find more information about him.

Tennis (October 29 2017)


When you work with a player and you work as a coach you have to look to see if there is talent.

The player needs to have some kind of talent.  It can take different forms.  They could have great balance.  They could have great strength.  They could have  a fast arm.   They could be very tough mentally.   They could have great hand-eye coordination.

If the player just has one of these talents then they are worthwhile to work with, it could just go be that they have good “balance” or could be they are “quick” on their feet.

Then the first thing to teach them is the forehand. And they need to be able to FEEL what it is like to hit a clean ball.    Right in the middle of their racquet with their arm extended.  So that way the player can understand that the technique does matter as opposed to flailing at the ball.

And then you want them to build some consistency with the forehand so they start to feel confident they can hit the ball a lot if they need to.

Then you move onto the backhand.

Then you develop topspin.

you want to teach the player to hit clean balls off of both sides and show them how to RALLY because you want them to understand what tennis is actually like.


Christopher Eubanks Tall Lanky and Powerful

He lost to Radek Stepanek 62 62

This player is a beast.  Based on hours of watching footage I can say that Eubanks is a powerhouse!

It is amazing how you can watch the matches from the challenger tournaments and notice how good the players are.  How will they do on the main tour?

Noah Rubin has won main draw matches.  Rubin recently played Federer and held his own.

But there is big difference between winning points against pro players and winning entire matches!

And it is amazing to think that these players are 5 star or blue chip players who are the best in their state or college but on the pro tour they could be destroyed!

The margins in tennis are so slim.

Enjoy this match here and watch the shots at 8:35 and onward to see some NASTY forehands from Eubanks.



Zero to Winning: Getting Started with Tennis

Tennis can be hard at first.  But with focus you can go from Zero to Winning in 4 months.

The 4 months number will fluctuate based on how frequently you play and how much intensity you play with.

The first thing to learn is forehand and backhand.   Repetition will be key.  Step one:  Focus on making contact right in the middle of the strings.       Step two:  Follow Through.  Be sure the racquet hits the ball and swings through over the shoulder for a full follow through.  This will help with the development of topspin!

Backhand.  Two hands on the racquet.  Lay the racquet back and drive out to the ball catching the ball in front and then following through.

You need to fell comfortable on both sides, hitting the ball in front of the body (Don’t want to make contact too late).   Once you feel like you are able to hit the ball with the forehand and backhand, then you must learn how to hit the ball on the move.   It really isn’t much different, it just requires better timing.     You want to build that skill gradually by throwing the ball and further and further away and hitting the ball and then recovering back to the middle of the court.

Then you need to learn how to serve.  A good toss will be crucial.  Be sure the ball is on the fingertips (not the palm) because you don’t want the ball to roll.  Place the ball up for serving and then swing and try to catch the ball at its highest point.   If you are right-handed then you want to swing through and let your racquet fall down to your left hip pocket.

Consistency is key.   You will need to be able to make 4 or 5 serves in a row so you have some muscle memory.     Also, you need to be able to make 2 or 3 shots in a row with forehand and backhand.

If you can serve the ball in play and you can hit your groundstrokes then you are basically ready to get started!

As you continue to play you can keep on building your skills, like your volley and your transition game.  BUT there are many people who are playing tennis that have not developed the consistency and the “SolidNess” to be strong during a match.     Learn to turn yourself into a “wall” early on and that will create more success for you.

-DJ ROBO BISCUIT, November 12 2016

Jared Donaldson (American Young Gun)

He is from Newport Rhode Island.

He trains with Taylor and Phil Dent.

He has a big forehand.   And he spent time developing his game in Argentina!

Here you can check out some of his other matches, even one when he was a freshman:


Here is against Monfils:


Here is a young Donaldson:


Plenty of Jared Donaldson!    His reputation has no doubt risen up.


The Chilean Bomber GONZO

Fernando Gonzalez otherwise known as GONZO otherwise known as THE FIESTY CHILEAN (Brad Gilbert said) otherwise known as The Bomber otherwise known as El Bombardero de La Reina and “Stone Hand”

Fernando was known for having one of the hardest forehands on tour.

During his career he entered his PRIME from 2007 to 2010.   Those were his winning years.

He played his best in the 2007 Australian Open where he reached  the final and was being coached by Larry Stefanki.    Fernando was playing smart, he would use a big slice serve to pull his opponent out wide and he would follow it up by hitting a BIG FOREHAND to the open court.   Another strategy he would use is to just SLICE SLICE SLICE his backhand and wait for his opportunity to hit a BIG FOREHAND.  He could also surprise his opponent by hitting his one-handed backhand HARD AND FLAT.

Federer said he did not think anybody hit the forehand as hard as Fernando.

When Gonzo “pulled the trigger” on his forehand it was a bullet.    Just as big (if not bigger) as the Del Potro forehand.

He also, played a really good match against Andy Roddick at the Australian Open in 2010.  It is called the “Roddick Gonzalez Super Shots”