Turn Pro Christopher Eubanks (Big Man)

Eubanks should go pro.

He played well against Fritz and Donaldson.   Fritz is a power player and Donaldson was a more solid version of Fritz and Donaldson had more training on the red clay so you can tell he plays with more margin of error.    In the end, Harrison was too strong and crafty for Eubanks.   Also, it was clear that Eubanks was not “on his game” against Harrison.    In his match against Fritz and Donaldson,  Eubanks played well by dominating with power tennis.   Big serving and big forehands.   He is 6 foot 8.   He should be able to crack more aces and hit more serves that are unreturnable.   if he has the desire then he should go Pro,  If Karlovic and Isner can do it then Eubanks can do it.      It was a great display by Eubanks and I think he could win more by “going for broke more often”    Attacking when his opponent is serving and going for aces in his game similar to Karlovic and Isner.   Also, Eubanks has a good one-handed backhand and a good slice.   He should continue to get up to the net.

I was happy with how Eubanks played and I hope he will keep playing more tournaments.  He has the game right now to be around the top 60 or top 70 of the ATP and he is going to have to “grind” to pull his game up to the top 30!   But Isner and Karlovic could do it.

-DJ ROBO BISCUIT

2017 NC Junior Tournaments Raleigh NC

July 8-9 Cary Summer Championships L4

July 15-16 Greene Central Summer Classic NC L4

July 28-30 DOCTA Open Jr Challenge

August 19-20 RRC Summer Challenger

September 1-3 Raleigh Summer Junior Tournament L4

September 30- October 1st Raleigh Fall Junior

July 15-16 RRC Summer Junior NC L5 tournament

July 21-23 2017 North Hills Club Summer Junior NC L5

August 5-6, 2017 12th Annual Croasdaile Country Club NC L5 Durham

 

DJ ROBO BISCUIT

Stay Fluffy

 

Junior Tournaments North Carolina 2017

March 4-5, March Indoor Junior at Barber Park L5 — Greensboro

March 11-12, Holly Springers Junior L5 — Holly Springs

March 18-19, 2017 Raleigh Junior L5 — Raleigh

April 1-2, 2017 RRC Spring Junior L5 — Raleigh

 

March 11-12 Ebony RC Jr. Spring Fling L4 — Raleigh

April 22-23 Chapel Hill Country Club Jr L4 Championship — Chapel Hill

 

 

 

Zero to Winning: Getting Started with Tennis

Tennis can be hard at first.  But with focus you can go from Zero to Winning in 4 months.

The 4 months number will fluctuate based on how frequently you play and how much intensity you play with.

The first thing to learn is forehand and backhand.   Repetition will be key.  Step one:  Focus on making contact right in the middle of the strings.       Step two:  Follow Through.  Be sure the racquet hits the ball and swings through over the shoulder for a full follow through.  This will help with the development of topspin!

Backhand.  Two hands on the racquet.  Lay the racquet back and drive out to the ball catching the ball in front and then following through.

You need to fell comfortable on both sides, hitting the ball in front of the body (Don’t want to make contact too late).   Once you feel like you are able to hit the ball with the forehand and backhand, then you must learn how to hit the ball on the move.   It really isn’t much different, it just requires better timing.     You want to build that skill gradually by throwing the ball and further and further away and hitting the ball and then recovering back to the middle of the court.

Then you need to learn how to serve.  A good toss will be crucial.  Be sure the ball is on the fingertips (not the palm) because you don’t want the ball to roll.  Place the ball up for serving and then swing and try to catch the ball at its highest point.   If you are right-handed then you want to swing through and let your racquet fall down to your left hip pocket.

Consistency is key.   You will need to be able to make 4 or 5 serves in a row so you have some muscle memory.     Also, you need to be able to make 2 or 3 shots in a row with forehand and backhand.

If you can serve the ball in play and you can hit your groundstrokes then you are basically ready to get started!

As you continue to play you can keep on building your skills, like your volley and your transition game.  BUT there are many people who are playing tennis that have not developed the consistency and the “SolidNess” to be strong during a match.     Learn to turn yourself into a “wall” early on and that will create more success for you.

-DJ ROBO BISCUIT, November 12 2016

On Grassroots Tennis PART 2

A coach who is willing to spread the game of tennis must also be willing to put down a little money.

BE the mobile tennis center.   Where you go, Tennis can happen!

Also, when you find a skilled player don’t let a lack of racquet stop them.   Let them use your racquet or have a couple of extra racquets (that are nice) and give them away.  That is a show of good faith (or goodwill) and that helps to build a bond.   Also, people who are not experienced, they think “a racquet is a racquet”   They are not concerned with Babolat vs Prince vs Head vs Wilson or even the concept of the “Player’s Racquet”

Allowing a player to use a nice racquet is something they will appreciate because they will be able to tell the racquet is designed for hitting balls.   Don’t let potential players wallow in the graveyard of bad equipment.

AND you must be an AMBASSADOR TO THE GAME!

Another way to help spread the game is to make sure you have some competition and play your matches on public courts.   If you have a good opponent and you will have a tough match you should play out in the open so people can watch; many people have not seen a competitive tennis match up close and in person.  If you can run and hit topspin then maybe they think you are a Professional (and you are!  A teaching Pro!   And you have the secrets to the game!   You are the one who can bring tennis into their life and into their community)


 

If you are training an apprentice and/or a Protege.  They need to have something to train for!   Give them a goal or maybe it is just to defeat you!    It will help them greatly if there are local tournaments and/or USTA junior tournaments for them to play in.   That way you can help them with forehands and backhands and serves and say something like “okay so in 3 weeks from now we are going to have you play in a tournament”  “stay focused because these kids will be able to hit balls and run and it is NOT going to be easy”

Getting your student/protege thinking about the tournament will help keep their mind “locked in” and thinking about tennis and winning matches and keeping the balls in play

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(Spread the Game of Tennis) (in the picture is Rick Macci with Venus and Serena)

On Grassroots Tennis (Experienced Opinion)

Written by DJ ROBO BISCUIT

Grassroots tennis is how you build up tennis in an area where it does not exist.  It is not needed in a community where there is a tennis club with an active populace.  It is also not necessarily needed in an affluent area with a private club.     Grassroots tennis is needed an area (or community) where the people are middle class or upper-lower class — This would imply that the parents are NOT college tennis players and there is not an ample supply of “Tennis Knowledge.”

One way to go about growing the game of tennis is for somebody who is a skilled player — let us say either a tennis coach or a 4.5 player or an ex-college player — to take up a protege or a young student.  In this community ideally the young student would be a boy or a girl of the age of 10 or 11 0r 12; this is a good age for the kid to learn the game based on their height and general coordination (and they can learn as the coach teaches).

This coach will need to have a big heart.  If tennis is entirely new to the community then one would suspect that the parents and/or adults will not see the value in the tennis because nobody is able to play and why should the parent pay a random stranger $20 or $30 or $40 per hour to show their kid how to hit some balls over a net???

The goal of the coach is to develop the young player from zero to hero.   Take the kid and teach him/her strokes and movement so that, over time,  the kid resembles the tennis players people would see on television.   As this one player develops there will be some small miracles that will occur.  1) the parents will start to see a tennis player instead of just their kid struggling to hit some balls       2)  Other people will see the player and coach while passing by; but more people will take notice of the small kid who looks like those professionals they see once or twice a year on television   3) Other children might start to take notice

A tennis coach has to do A LOT of talking in order to explain the game and “pitch” the idea of playing tennis to parents and curious people.   Nothing and i mean NOTHING works more magic than the skill of the student.   Once the young student (boy or girl) shows the ability to play tennis and run around and hit the ball and win points; YOU as the Coach has gained credibility and all of a sudden, you shall be a respected expert.  There is also a high chance that other kids (hopefully athletic) will want to learn the game.

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