The Working Poor (Poverty In America)

 

In one respect, Ann was typical of the low-wage working people I spoke with across the country – in New Hampshire towns, North Carolina fields, and Los Angeles Housing Projects.  They were white and black, Latino and Asian, native-born and newly arrived in America, and they were not gripped by rage.  Ann did not point a finger of blame.  She did not make sweeping criticisms of society at large.  “I got myself into this, I made the choices,” she said plainly.  “In spite of the fact that the credit card companies are taking advantage of people, that they’re really awful in charging such awful interest rates, I made the choice of using them.  I haven’t used them in a couple of years.  And plus I can’t answer the phone.”  She did not answer the phone because she hated to hear the bill collectors.  “They have all kinds of tones of voices,” she said.  They left alarming messages on the answering machine, like, “Call this number immediately.”

Always when she talked this way she then apologized for “complaining.”  But I was an instigator in her complaints, I suppose, for I kept asking questions.  What does this feel like?  What do you think about?  How foreign does the zone along the edge of poverty seems to someone who grew up in middle-class comfort?  “Nobody really wants to know that sometimes $2 is a significant amount, and $25 always is tremendous,” she said, as if this condition still amazed her as well.  “Tell me it’s not true for ordinary, everyday people.  Is it the same?  I mean, normal life” — she gave a despairing laugh — “before life was like this.  I can’t remember.  I can’t remember what it was like.  I mean, every day and every night when I’m trying to fall asleep, there’s this worry hanging.  Is the car gonna make it through because I haven’t maintained it properly?  How am I gonna get this?  I know I have to do this.  How am I gonna get it done?  How am I gonna stretch to get these bills paid?  If one extra thing happens — .”       – Excerpt from The Working Poor Invisible in America by David K Shipler

The Comedy (Part 2)

The Comedy is not so funny.

It is a movie that makes you think.   The film is a Rick Alverson production.

The movie explores the world through the character Swanson.  He is an aging Brooklyn hipster who has trust fund money.

As the movie progresses he puts himself in more and more risky situations.

The film is trying to explore what life is like when you are a person whose life is a sarcastic life and one that is full of irony.   The questions of “Who Am I?” “What should I do with myself?”

As you watch it, it does make you ponder what life is like for a ThirtyIsh year old Trust Fund kid who does not have ambition to capitalize on their good fortune.

-DJ ROBO BISCUIT

LEARNING AFTER SCHOOL (MORE)

 

The pursuit of lifelong learning is noble indeed.   The world is full of knowledge.

A good place to start is “Will Durant.”  Will Durant wrote “The Story of Civilization.”

Another excellent resource is “School of Life” on Youtube.

Here is an example:

 

Also, Learning leads to more learning.

For one example:   DJ ROBO BISCUIT wanted to learn more about cults in America.

DJ ROBO BISCUIT has learned about Scientology, Warren Jeffs, The Moonies, and the Westboro Baptist Church.

The author recommends “Going Clear” (it is a book).     Also, as a good satire I also recommend “Zone Theory: 7 Steps to achieve a Perfect Life” (I have not read this book)

When you learn about one topic it will hopefully peak your interest and push you towards learning some more.

“Don’t Let Education Get in the Way of your Learning” -Mark Twain (I think I got that right)

USE THE INTERNET! and USE BOOKS!

-DJ ROBO BISCUIT   (May 3rd, 2016)